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Evening News
Sydney,  February 1905, page 7.

A SUNDAY IN ME SDBF.
CONTINENTAL BATHING AT MANLY.
(BY E. J.)
'The sea, the sea, the open sea,
The blue, the fresh, the ever free;
It's full of folks as full xan be,
At Manly in the morning,'

These lines, sung to the inspiriting strains of
the doxology, awoke me one Sunday morning at Manly.
The singer was stumping up and down
the passage of our cottage on the ocean beach,
slamming on the doors of various rooms frith a
knotted towel.
The hour 'was shortly after dawn, and it -was
evident, from certain long-dnwn notes pro
ceeding from some of the rooms, that the occu
pants --f those rooms preferred the arms of
Morpheus to the rougher embrace of Father
Neptune. . '
Five ; minutes . later, however the energetic
member of our party again promenaded the pas
sage, th!« tJme bellowing forth the old fo'c'flle
cry, 'Arise, ye. sleepers, arise, arise O!-'
Having distinct recollections of the pains and
penalties that an unprompt attention to that
call evoked— in days that were, put are not— the
sleepers turned out all standing, and as we were
right on the beach we went down in the pre
scribed bathing costume, with towels twisted
round our necks, 'to keep out tie draught,' as
a facetious member of the party remarked.
INVIGORATING AS CHAMPAGNE.
Though the morning was still young, the sun
was making its warmth felt, and had already
dispersed those mists that cling in festoons
round the gates of dawn.
From Freshwater to Fairy Cove the ocean lay
m long swells of turquoise blue and emerald
green, deepening to wonderful purples where
rocks and weeds approached the surface A
nor'-easter was tumbling the breakers in In
mile-long lines of creaming foam, and the air
was as invigorating as. champagne.
Already the breakers facing the men's bath
ing place were dotted with heads, while solitary
craniums here and there along tlie stretch of surf
denoted where householders or guests were tak
ing a matutinal dip.
BATHING A LA MODE.
Surf bathing at Manly partakes of the delight
ful method In vogue on the Continental and
American seaboards. Not only does man dis
port himself and revel in the ecstacy of the ele
ments, but 'so do his sisters, and his cousins,
and his aunts 'likewise iis wife and daughters,
if he Is married, not to mention his sweetheart
Se^edness.11'^8^^^11^ ' Si^le
When one goes surf bathing at Manly one
£«¥«' g° **? tte -water Vfive mZtes and
!n?£,-K?me, Out **&**- One spends the day
amphibiously^ in^nd xmt:of the water, basktag
Leek in 'fh °n th| bea^^ tor*«* «P to -mTI
of ™,n* eand- anli' tT?m~ this ^'er coign
-hT^M? ' ******** p* * desperate flirtation
sti*a.I3Sisr&- ™- u it *»«-* *
Our party ^consisted of four men and a couple
Of Bves fair daughters, and until breakfast
time we kept In the surf opposite our cottage
well away_from thi more crowded waters/
'WARE SHARKS.
Though we Were all swimmers, none ventured
put beyond the line of breakers, for beyond that
line, It is said, the hungry shark waits for the
unwary, or the strong current engulfs one sap
ping the strength of the strri|gest swimmer In
its . relentless outward sweepr ?
Our time was put injaiving through incoming
breakers, or waiting for the back of a comber
to carry »ne along on its crest, landing one
far up on the warm wet sand In a smother of
foam, to , the accompaniment of peals of
laughter.
Surf bathing is the laziest form of energetic
enjoyment in the world. One need do nothing
but sit or lie down— the breakers do the
rest. »
After some tea, and lemon in place of milk —
this latter removes the salty taste in one's
mouth, besides being far more refreshing teas
milk— and some fruit, we strolled, still in bath
Ing attire, down to the more crowded part of
the beach opposite the chute.
THE DOG NUISANCE.
.This is where faithful PIdo comes in. There
should be a separate part of the beach for dogs
to bathe -in, if they years for surf bathing.
Dogs are very nice at dog shows, or staffed, or
chained up in a backyard, but among the break
er* and on the beach they are best when ab
sent.
The morning; me arrived where all the world
of. Manly And Ms wife were disporting them
eelves in the briny* there was & pletbora of
dogs, varying tn size from *nes as big as a calf
to the toy terrier. One huge shaggy fcrute fead
lost his master and as It is & well-known fact
that water destroys scent, tills particular St&Q
made wild 'Springs at everyblodyr-men ~ and
women (the human form and dress being much
of a muchness' In the' water)'— in bis frantic
efforts to and his master. ' '
WATCHING .THE SPORT, _''
In the afternoon the Eydney-sidejrs go, over
in hundreds, and, armed with bags- of buns,
biscuits, and bananas, take up ' positions along
the sea wall and feLVe, to' watch .the bathers.
Fewer women bathe in the afternoon-' the
morning's effort, combined with -the heat of
the sun, produce; a langqur, that invites the
selsta, which is' often indrijed in on Vthe sand
in the sun, without resource 'to additional rai
ment, -;bar a mushroom hat : to' ? guard 'the com
plexion. . * ' ' '
Said one antiquated female to another gazing
at the bathers the day. we were Indulging in
a dip a la Trouville, J'I thins -itfs disgraceful
to ,seev those women bathing with men. I won
der it's allowed. Do the police know it goes
on?' To which charitable remark 'her friend
replied, 'And fancy them bathing on Sunday
atferooon, too! Yotfre right, Martha, it Is
disgraceful,' and the concentrated venom in
their combined utterances would tavemade a
good supply for a Borgia for a week,- overtime
included.
Quite different was a remark made by another
wo-_an. she turned to her husband and said,
'Jim, if you weren't a bjgger fool than Nature
intended you to be, you'd Jiave brought/some
bathing things down, and we and the children
could have had a good bathe, instead «t- having
to trudge about all day long.v , ' ? ' '
'It does look Inviting,' said Jiata. ;
''What's the good of the invitation when we
can't accept it?' demanded his better half.
'Next time you bring us to Manly, . James,
we're going to be sensible, ana spend the day
in the water.'
Thc^e is not a healthier or bfetter- way of
spending a Sunday afternoon for the tired city
man and nis just-as-tired city wife than a
plunge in the breakers. One forgets old age,
care, and all the worries flesh is heir to in the
delight of forcing one's way through the on
coming lines of limpid green water; one's skin
tinecles with the freshness of it all; one's brain
feels brighter, and one will sleep the sounder
for it afterwards.
If one can find sermons in stones- and lessons
in the running brooks, surely one can, find a
whole service on the 1 osom of the 'great, sweet
mother — mother and lover of m;en— rthe sea.'

1905 'A SUNDAY IN THE SURF.', Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), 3 February, p. 7. , viewed 09 Nov 2016,
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article112746062

The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser
22 February 1905, page 478.


1905 'MANLY AND ITS RECREATIONS.', The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1871 - 1912), 22 February, p. 478. , viewed 09 Nov 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article164032648 


New Zealand Illustrated Magazine
1 March 1905, page 413 - 419.
HONOLULU.
By C. L. HARRIS.

ENTERING Honolulu Harbour in the early morning a beautiful panorama presents itself.
On the left hand, towards the Northwest, one is struck with the wonderful atmospheric effect which produces a softness and harmony of tint lovely to look upon.
The immediate foreground of calm, green water, .gradually changing- to a dark-blue where the rollers curl their foamcrested tips shorewards, the beach of yellow sand succeeded by olivegreen cane-fields and plantations of a darker hue, backed by rugged volcanic hills, irregularly wooded, their tops steeped in the morning sunshine, make a scene which enchants the eye of the ocean traveller, so sick and tired of the eternal sea.
...
Page 417
...
The most popular sport among the Hawaiians is surf bathing and surf riding, and a twenty-minutes ride on an electric car from the ...

Page 419

... centre of the City brings us to Waikiki, the great swimming beach of Honolulu, whence every visitor is enjoined to go to taste the glories of a dip in the Pacific.
Here one may indulge in a surf-board ride or a ride in a surf-canoe.
The surfcanoe is manned by natives, but the surf-board the bather handles himself.
A ride to shore from the end of the reef upon the crest of a foaming billow is an exhilarating and thrilling experience.
The manipulation of the surf-board requires skill and nerve.
It looks easy, but is by no means as easy as it looks, and although the natives even get expert enough to stand upon the boards, yet the uninitiated white man finds it difficult enough to retain his position when stretched at length thereon.
The board is a smooth, slightly convex piece of timber, some fourteen feet long, slightly tapering from two feet in width at one end to eighteen inches at the other, and varying in thickness from about five inches in the centre to an inch at the edges.
This the bather takes right out to the edge of the reef, and, watching his opportunity, mounts his slippery steed just as a roller rises and rides right in to shore on its curling, foaming crest.

Like the Maoris, the Hawaiians have a great number of traditional legends, and there is hardly a cliff, valley or plain, headland or bay, that is not the scene of some mythical adventure or love romance.

National Library of New Zealand : PAPERSPAST
HONOLULU.
New Zealand Illustrated Magazine , 1 March 1905, Page 413
http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/

The Sydney Morning Herald
Wednesday 1 March 1905, page 10.

SURF BATHING AT MANLY.

Mr. D. Hogan, of Manly, writes today that the lifeboat crew did very smart work in rescuing the people whose lives were endangered in the surf at the ocean beach on Wednesday.
As soon as the crew observed the signal the made for the breakers and skilfully effected the rescue.
Another correspondent also bears testimony to the work of the crew, which did very smart work, considering, that in his opinion, the boat was undermanned.

Mr. Archibal Hannan writes to say that the report of a life saving incident at manly was incorrect, so far as it referred to himself.
He simply went to the rescue of a friend, and got ashore without any assistance.


The Hawaiian Gazette.
Honolulu, March 17, 1905, page 3.

FIESTA OF SURF BOATS AT WAIKIKI ON MONDAY

Many of the recent arrivals in Honolulu have been struck by one feature of Honolulu life and that is the surf-boat riding at Waikiki Beach, to be found nowhere on the globe amid such surroundings as in the Hawaiian Islands.

On next Monday afternoon it is intended to make a fiesta of surf boats if possible, and to this the Promotion Committee is endeavoring to get all canoe owners, to bring their boats out to the beach near the Moana and Hawaiian Hotel Annex frontages.

The Hawaiian Government Band under the leadership of Captain Berger will stationed at the end of the Moana Hotel pier from 3:30 to 5:30 o'clock in the afternoon, where it will discourse sweet and stirring strains.
It is expected that a big crowd will be out to enjoy the novelty.

Chronicling America
The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, March 17, 1905, Image 3
Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI
Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1905-03-17/ed-1/seq-3/

The Hawaiian Star.
Honolulu, March 20, 1905, page 5.


WATER CARNIVAL TODAY.

There is a carnival of canoes and surf board riders this afternoon at Waikiki opposite the Moana Hotel.

Good sized crowds are present.
The band is in attendance.

Chronicling America

The Hawaiian star. (Honolulu [Oahu]) 1893-1912, March 20, 1905, SECOND EDITION, Image 5
Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI
Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015415/1905-03-20/ed-1/seq-5/

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser.
Honolulu, March 20, 1905, page 9.


SURF BOAT FIESTA AT WAIKIKI BEACH

The fiesta of surf-boats will take place this afternoon from 3:30 to 5:30 at Waikiki beach, between the Moana Hotel and Hawaiian Hotel Annex.

The Hawaiian Government Band will be present all this time at the end of the Moana Hotel pier.
The fiesta is designed to bring out all Hawaiian canoes and other craft in a display which has not before been attempted, at least in recent years.
It is expected many will be decorated suitably.
It is also expected that young men skilled in standing on surf boards, as thev are driven in toward the land by the billows, will be present.

Chronicling America
The Pacific commercial advertiser. (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, March 20, 1905, Image 9
Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI
Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1905-03-20/ed-1/seq-9/


The Hawaiian Star.
Honolulu, March 21, 1905, page 7.

THE SURF BOAT FIESTA AT WAIKIKI
LARGE CROWDS GO OUT TO WITNESS THE NOVEL DIVERSION -
MANY SURF BOARD RIDERS.

The surf boat fiesta at the Waikiki Beach yesterday afternoon attracted large crowds thither.

The beach from Kinau Hale to beyong the Moana hotel was crowded with sight seers and merry makers.
Several hundred people including probably nearly every tourist and visitor in the city, were there to see the novel attraction.

There were a dozen or more canoes of different sizes taking part in the entertainment.
A number of very merry parties of both men and women were out in canoes riding the surf.

The sea was rather too smooth for the most exciting surf riding but later in the afternoon, the curlers began coming in and at times there were a half dozen or more surf boats with as many swimmers on surf boards, riding in toward the shore on the self same roller.
It was exciting and exhilarating.

There were exhibited a number of fine examples of surf board riding, the riders standing erect on their boards.
One rider there was who stood on his head on his surf board, riding along in advance of the curling breaker.
C. C. Bitting introduced diversion by riding his horse into the water.
A soldier from Camp McKinley who was in swimming was seized with cramps and was only rescued by another bather who brought him ashore.
The soldier was unconscious for some time.
Altogether It was a very pleasing and enjoyable festival.

Chronicling America
The Hawaiian star. (Honolulu [Oahu]) 1893-1912, March 21, 1905, SECOND EDITION, Image 7
Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI
Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015415/1905-03-21/ed-1/seq-7/

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser
Honolulu, March 21, 1905, page  7.


GREAT CROWD WATCHES FLAG BEDECKED BOATS MANEUVER AT WAIKIKI

The surf-boat meet at Waikiki Beach yesterday afternoon brought to the sandy shores at the Hawaiian Hotel Annex and the
Moana Hotel a great throng of people, who spent an enjoyable afternoon under the shade of the trees at both hostelries, watching
the maneuvers of the native canoes and the bathers and listening to the melodies which floated over the water.
There may not have been very much to the surf-boat fiesta side of the entertainment, but the motive served to draw to the beach hundreds of people, and the mere fact that they came and sat along the sandy shore was an outing in itself, such an outing that aids the social side of Honolulu life.

At the end of the Moana pier the Hawaiian Government Band under the direction of Kapellmeister Berger, played from 3:30 to
5:30 o'clock and the inspiriting music, now a quick-step, now a dreamy waltz and again a ragtime, caused the majority to keep
time with their feet, heads and hands.
The lawns fronting on the Annex property were filled with people, mostly of the feminine gender.
Children ere present en masse, and to them it was a great holiday.-
They played in the sand, tumbled into the water, built frail castles which were ruthlessly swept away by the inrush of the surf. There was life from one part of the beach to the other.

Unfortunately Father Neptune seemed to be taking a nap, for the sea was placid, almost mill-pond, and the surf-boat enthusiasts
had to search for billows on which to race toward tHe shore.
But the surf-boats had plenty of fun.
One great canoe was filled with young people who wore red carnation leis.
The prow of their boat was resplendent with flags.
Another bore an American flag.
There were canoe races, sometimes half a dozen being in line on the same billow.
One of the most interesting features of the day was the surf-board riding of some young men who came in on their boards
standing upright.

There was one thing which for a time threatened to mar the afternoon's sport.
A lawyer astride a horse rode into the surf and rounded the Moana pier, with bad results to the animal which could barely keep its nostrils above the water.
The rider's actions caused Deputy Sheriff Rawlins and Lieut. Leslie to order him out and off the beach.
The rider went into the water in his street suit.
During the afternoon a soldier who was in swimming had a narrow escape from drowning.
He was seized with cramps when beyond his depth and went down.
A near-by bather caught him and carried him ashore.
He was unconscious for some time, but later recovered sufficiently to go home.

Chronicling America

The Pacific commercial advertiser. (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, March 21, 1905, Image 7
Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI
Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1905-03-21/ed-1/seq-7/

Evening Bulletin
Honolulu, March 25, 1905, page 6.


The surfboat fiesta at Waikikl beach on Tuesday afternoon was a most Interesting event.
The Hawaiian Gov
ernment band was stationed at the extreme end of the Moana Hotel pier and played gay and inspiring music
under the direction of
Mr. Berger.
A
huge gathering ot people was upon the lawns ot the Moana and Annex, and they watched with interest the pretty surfboats loaded with their happy crews.
The surf was not running very
high but there was piety ot fun, and "go" about the whole affair.
The surf
board riding was very much admired by the tourists and strangers, and was qulte a feature of the afternoon's performance.
Children flayed upon the
lawns, and, the light dresses of the feminine element made a very pretty scene.
This will be only one of many
such occasions, for not often do so many hundreds ot people come together under such pleasant auspices.

Chronicling America

Evening bulletin. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii) 1895-1912, March 25, 1905, 2:30 O'CLOCK EDITION, Image 6
Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI
Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016413/1905-03-25/ed-1/seq-6/

The Age
Queanbeyan, Tuesday 4 April 1905, page 2.


HAWAII, THE INHABITANTS, CUSTOMS, AND LAWS
...
We sighted the magnificent Beach of Waikiki, together with Diamond Head, standing quite adjacent to the beach in question.
On this beach it is a pretty sight to witness the surf riders which past time is conducted in specially constructed boats.

Trove

1905 'HAWAII, THE INHABITANTS, CUSTOMS, AND LAWS.', The Age (Queanbeyan, NSW : 1904 - 1907), 4 April, p. 2. , viewed 24 Apr 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31098744

The Hawaiian Star.
Honolulu, April 15, 1905, page 6.

WILL LEAP FROM A HEIGHT OF 80 FEET
ONE OF THE SPECTACULAR FEATURES OF THE COMING WATER CARNIVAL AT NAVAL WHALF

GEORGE FREETH, WHO WILL MAKE THE 80-FOOT LEAP
.

One of the principal attractions of the water carnival that will take place at the Naval docks on Saturday evening, April 22, will be the 80-foot leap by George Freeth, the wonderful diver.
If you can Imagine a scaffold erected as high as the Young Hotel roof garden you can picture the height from which Young Freeth will leap through the air to the water below.
This will be the first time that a dive of this height has ever been at tempted in Honolulu.

Both the Myrtle and Healani Boat Club boys are working hard to condition themselves for the coming races.
The 50-yard championship event between Renear, Kopke, Kimokeo and Freeth Is attracting unusual attention as the world's record may be broken for that distance.
The Naval docks will present a gay scene on the night of the show.
They will be brilliantly lighted with electric lights.
Seats will be so arranged that
every one can have a good view of the
events.
Seats will be placed on sale today at Woods and Sheldon's.

Chronicling America
The Hawaiian star. (Honolulu [Oahu]) 1893-1912, April 15, 1905, Image 6
Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI
Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015415/1905-04-15/ed-1/seq-6/

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser
Honolulu, April 16, 1905, Sunday Edition, page 11.


GREAT WATER CARNIVAL

On Saturday evening next the Myrtle and Healani Boat Clubs will hold their first annual water carnival in the slip between the Naval Docks. This carnival will consist chiefly of aquatic sports such as swimming races, fancy swimming, spring board and trapeze diving.
The two boat clubs will contest for championship honors.
...
The swimming meet will be remarkable inasmuch as a world's champion will participate.
Dan Renear, who broke the 100 yard record, is the party. referred to.
He is out this time for the  50 yard record and the silver cup that will be put up for the event.
At present ix men have entered for this championship event.
The Myrtles will have Kopke and Hustace in the match, while Renear and Freeth will represent the Healanis.
Kimokeo will represent the Hawaiian swimmers.

Kimokeo
RECORD LEAP.

George Freeth. who Is known through-out the United States as a wonderful diver, will make an eighty foot leap from a scaffold built high in the air.
He and Renear will also give an exhibition of many pretty stunts that can be done from a swinging trapeze.
These two make a team that is hard to equal in any circus in the country.
The spring board diving and tumbling will be worth seeing.

LADIES' RACE.

Besides the many other interesting features of the show will be a ladies' race open to any woman who wishes to enter.

Up to the pieent time there have been five entries, all native girls.
These girls can certainly make time, all using the double over-hand stroke.

Chronicling America
The Pacific commercial advertiser. (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, April 16, 1905, Sunday Edition, Image 11
Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI
Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1905-04-16/ed-1/seq-11/

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser
Honolulu, April 23, 1905, Sunday Edition, page 1.


HONOLULU CARNIVAL

NAVAL DOCKS


Healani and Myrtle boat club men combined last nigrht to make the first water carnival held in Honolulu's harbour, one of the most successful aquatic entertainments ever attempted here.
Thousands of people witnessed a fine exhibition of sports which displayed the skill of Honolulu's young men to advantage.
In swimming, racing, high and fancy diving and general good fun the exhibition was one which.should be held annually.
The carnival came off between Naval Docks 1 and 2 which were kindly given.over to the two boat clubs by Captain Niblick. U. S. N.. acting commandant of the Naval Station.
The.wide slip between the two was the scene of the entertainment, the watery area being outlined in strings of electric globes.
Across the slip was another string of incandescents which lighted up the space clearly.
A huge coal barge with a high-diving stage rigged overhead, was also outlined with lights.
...
On the big coal barge, the Hawaiian Government band whiled away the intervals with enlivening music.
From 5 o'clock until after 10 there was something doing.
The great event, of course, was the fifty-yard championship race, in which Dan Renear, represented the Healanis; Enest Kopke and Tom Hustace, the Myrtles; Wagner, the U. S. Navy. ....
The last number on the program was the 300-yard relay race, which aroused great enthusiasm.
For the Healanis, Dan Rentar, Geo. Freeth, Will Dickson, Sanford, and Heilbron, and another, were entered.
For the Myrtles the swimmers were Ernest Kopke, Tom Hustace, Crozier, Beckert, Lyle and Tom Honan.
The Myrtles won with Hustace taking the honors after an exciting finish.
The intermediate program was devoted to a small boy's 50 yard dash, won by Palika.

The trapeze flying and fancy diving was one of the prettiest features of the evening.
Dan Renear and George Freeth were the premiers, making clear, daring dives, with double somersaults.
Willie Campbell, garbed as a woman, never failed to amuse with his funny stunts.
It was. left for Lieut. Glover of the U.S.R.C. Bear to make a hit.
He was announced as "Miss Jessie Glover."
He was attired neatly in a bathing suit, and made two high dives from the rigging over the pontoon.
Then came George Freeth in his daring 80-foot dive.
The distance was so great and the lights so tantalizing that water had to be thrown on the surface to stir it so that Freeth could see it distinctly before making the leap.
He made the dive prettily and was cheered.
The clothes race, in which the half dozen young men swimming had to climb into a barge half away across the slip, and don pajamas, and then swim the remainder of the course, was amusing.
The "ladies" race was participated in by Healani and Myrtle members dressed as girls.
Their race was fun-provoking.
The 100-yard obstacle race created great sport.
The swimmers had to pass through life buoys, barrels, over and under floating pilings, etc.
The officials were Prof. Woods, announcer and referee; W. Soper and Dr. Hobdy, judges; F. A. Mott-Smith, timekeeper; O. L. Sorenson, starter; Chas. Crane, clerk of course; Jess Woods, master of ceremonies.

Chronicling America
The Pacific commercial advertiser. (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, April 23, 1905, Sunday Edition, Image 1
Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI
Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1905-04-23/ed-1/seq-1/

Evening Bulletin
Honolulu, June 10, 1905, page 6.

Social Side of Life

Quite the important social event of the week was the wedding of Miss Rosalie Cunha and Dr Harvey Murray at the Moana Hotel on Wednesday evening.
The wedding took place at the Small cottage, as it is always called, attached to the hotel, which the Cunhas have been occupying for some time.
The whole day had been spent in decoration and each room was a bower of artistic beauty.
Only the most intimate friends and relatives were present at the ceremony which ws performed by Father Stevens in the impressive ritual of the Roman Catholic Church.
Miss Cunha and Dr Murray were united in the holy bonds of matrimony in the alcove of the drawing room and the bride was given into the keeping of the groom by her father, Mr. E. S. Cunha.
She was supported on her left by the Princess Kawananakoa, who was matron of honor,
and Mr Clarence Cunha, a brother of the bride, acted as best man.
...
The wedding presents which were on view in a room on the second floor would fill a large shop with silver, glass and objects d'art.
They were beautiful, costly and in many Instances unusual.
Mr. Cunha's wedding gift was a large lot at Walklki, fronting the sea with a house to be built In the near future and a large check for the furnishings.
...
Among those present were ... Mrs. Freeth, Mr. George Freeth, ...

Chronicling America
Evening bulletin. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii) 1895-1912, June 10, 1905, 2:30 O'CLOCK EDITION, Image 6
Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI
Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016413/1905-06-10/ed-1/seq-6/

The Hawaiian Star.
Honolulu June 16, 1905, page 3.
Another Book About Hawaii
...
One of the most readable book that has appeared in many months is "The Girl From Home," by Isobel Strong, which Is brought out by McClure, Phillips & Co., of New York.
The plot is slender, but there are a dozen well drawn, sharply-delined characters, and the story gives a series of pictures of Honolulu life of thirty years ago that is very attractive.
Isobel Strong is that stepdaughter of Robert Louis Stevenson to whom he dictated many of his stories in Samoa, and of whom she probably learned the secret of story writing.
...
The descriptions such as a reception at the palace are very well done, the most stiking being the picture of a surf-riding party at midnight given by the King.
 
Chronicling America
The Hawaiian star. (Honolulu [Oahu]) 1893-1912, June 16, 1905, SECOND EDITION, Image 3
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The Hawaiian Star
Honolulu, July 8, 1905, page 1.
Personnel Of The Big
(Associated Press)
SAN FRANCISCO, July 8
Secretary of War Taft and Miss Alice Roosevelt, sailed on the S. S. Manchuria this afternoon for Manila via Honolulu, ac companied by U. S. Senators Warren, Patterson, Scott, Long, Foster and Newlands; Representatives Hill, Jones, Longworth, Foss, Otjen, Payne, Cooper, Drlscoll, Grosvenor, Scott, Smith, Loud, Do Armond, Howard, Gilbert, Curtis, Parsons, Sherley and Cochran
The total of the entire party is 104.

Chronicling America
The Hawaiian star. (Honolulu [Oahu]) 1893-1912, July 08, 1905, Image 1
Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI
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The Hawaiian Gazette.
Honolulu, July 14, 1905, page 2.
SUPERVISORS IN COUNTY SECTIONS WOULD BE KINGS

Standing committees of the County Board of Supervisors may be announced next Tuesday evening when the rules governing tho deliberations of the Board will be adopted.
...
Moore showed designs for a county seal prepared by Viggo Jacobsen and Wichman. 
The Jacobsen design contains a picture of Diamond Head, with surf-riding in the foreground. 
It would be a very large seal. 
H. F. Wichman & Co. also presented a design for approval.
The committee, consisting of Moore and Paele, did not understand that It had to approve any design. 
The Board adopted the Diamond Head seal.
 
 

Chronicling America
The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, July 14, 1905, Image 2
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The Hawaiian Star.
Honolulu, July 14, 1905, page 5.

PERSONAL FRIENDS ACCOMPANY HER
MISS ALICE ROOSEVELT HAS TWO GUESTS ALONG ON THIS TRIP.
ONE INTERESTED IN RED CROSS

Although MIs Alice Roosevelt Is one of the big Taft Party, still she is accompanied by an inner circle of her friends. Several young women acquaintances are travelling with her for the trip.
Miss Amy McMillan of Detroit a daughter or the U. S. Senator McMillan of Michigan is one and the other Is Miss Mabel Boardman of Washington.
The later is interested In Red Cross work and will make a special effort In Japan to study the workings of that wonderful part of the Japanese military system.
All of the young women are accompanied by maids.
Mrs. Senator nubols is the official chaperone of Miss Roosevelt and her friends.
...
There was one very particular reason for special attention being directed toward Miss Roosevelt and this was
the fact of the presence of a gentleman whoso name has been associated with that of the young woman.
Representative Nicholas Longworth of Ohio is said according to Washington gossip to be an admirer of Miss Roosevelt.
He showed her much attention as did other gentlemen on the vessel, but If anybody looked for the announcement of any engagement on the arrival of the vessel at Honolulu, they were disappointed.



Chronicling America
The Hawaiian star. (Honolulu [Oahu]) 1893-1912, July 14, 1905, SECOND EDITION, Image 5
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The Hawaiian Star.
Honolulu, July 14, 1905, page 8.

ALICE SURF RIDING

Waikiki was the resort of the Taft party this afternoon.
After the luncheon at the Hawaiian Hotel a majority of the visitors took aumobiles or other vehicles for the Moana Hotel, where surf riding had been arranged for them.
Miss Alice Roosevelt had her first experience as a surf rider and Secretary Taft also had a chance to enjoy the novel sport of riding surf in a Hawaiian boat.
 
Chronicling America
The Hawaiian star. (Honolulu [Oahu]) 1893-1912, July 14, 1905, SECOND EDITION, Image 8
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The Hawaiian Gazette,
Honolulu, July 14, 1905, page 1.

GOVERNOR AND SECRETARY.

Acting Governor Atkinson will await the arrival of the territory's guests at the Hackfeld dock, and will there welcome Secretary Taft to the Islands.
In the meantime the committee's dispatch boat will have communicated ashore the wishes of the Secretary, should there be any silent change in.tbe program as already printed, so that no time will be lost in getting the large
party under way for the first of the day's trips.



Chronicling America

The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, July 14, 1905, Image 1
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The Pacific Commercial Advertiser
Honolulu, July 15, 1905, page 1.


THE TAFT-ROOSEVELT PARTY WAS SPLENDIDLY RECEIVED
Visitors Had The Time of Their Lives

...
"This surfing is glorious.
I never imagined that one could enjoy anything so much in so short a time as I have enjoyed this day in Honolulu," was the remark made by Miss Alice Roosevelt
at Waikiki yesterday afternoon.

Chronicling America
The Pacific commercial advertiser. (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, July 15, 1905, Image 1
Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI
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The Pacific Commercial Advertiser
Honolulu, July 15, 1905, page 2.
THE TAFT-ROOSEVELT PARTY
(Continued from Page 1.)
...
ALICE A FAVORITE.
...
And it is safe to say that although Nicholas Longworth of Indiana is said to be her accepted suitor, Miss Roosevelt did not let that matter interfere with her enjoyment of a short day in Honolulu.
Of course, Acting-Governor A. L. C. Atkinson had the inside course officially, in winning Miss Roosevelt's attention, but Mr. Walter F. Dillingham had his social innings too, for during the trip to Honolulu Plantation and the automobile drive to the Pali, Mr. Dillingham was the personal escort of Miss Roosevelt.
Being a Harvard man, the college from which President Roosevelt graduated, Mr. Dillingham had a double opportunity to pay court to Miss Alice.

Chronicling America
The Pacific commercial advertiser. (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, July 15, 1905, Image 2
Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI
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The Pacific Commercial Advertiser
Honolulu, July 16, 1905, Sunday Advertiser, page 10.

SOCIETY

Society was agog over the presence in Honolulu of Miss Alice Roosevelt, and society found her a very charming young woman indeed.

She fell in with the plans of the local committees in a manner to endear her to Honolulans and especially to those who are admirers of her father, the President.

From
early morning until the Manchuria continued on her voyage to the Orient, Miss Roosevelt never for a moment showed any inclination to get away

The trip to the Pali and the Honolulu plantation, the luncheon at the Royal Hawaiian Hotel, the  surfing at the beach and the visit to the Aquarium were all on the general  program and she did not deviate from it in any particular, except when she was driven to a private beach residence where she donned a bathing suit lo go canoeing.

billows near the Moana Hotel where the crowd gathered to see the little American princess enjoy one of Hawaii's greatest of outdoor sports, riding the waves in a Hawaiian out-rigger canoe.
Screams of delight es
caped Miss Roosevelt's lips as the boat shot toward the shore and she expressed herself as thoroughly satisfied with that part of the day's sport.
Mrs. Arthur M. Brown had the honor of being the only member of society to entertain Miss Roosevelt at a private home.

In the party which went to the Brown residence were Miss Roosevelt, Mrs. Dubois and Secretary Taft, while Mrs. ehard Ivers assisted in making up the canoeing set.
Acting Governor "Jack" Atkinson, Mr. Nicholas Longworth, Mrs. Brown and Mrs. Ivers, with two Hawaiians occupied the canoe.
They managed to catch a few good

Irwin, Miss Helene Irwin, Miss Hyde Smith, Miss Alice Macfarlane, Mrs. Walbridge, Mr. Walter Dillingham, Mr.Robert Atkinson, Mr. A. M. Brown.

from the madding crowd and see Honolulu privately.
The trip to the Pali and the Honolulu plantation, the luncheon at the Royal Hawaiian Hotel, the  surfing at the beach and the visit to the Aquarium were all on the general  program and she did not deviate from it in any particular, except when she
was driven to a private beach residence where she donned a bathing suit lo go canoeing.
Mrs. Arthur M. Brown
had the honor of being the only member of society

Bolulu privately.
The trip to the PaliAmong others who were at

In yhe party that went to the the Brown
cottage during the afternoon were Mr. and Mrs. Gerrit Wilder, Captain and Mrs. Niblack, Mrs. C. B. Cooper, Miss Nellie Kitchen, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. G. B. Wood, M. Robert Pratt, Mrs. Wells

graduated from Yale this year, will return to Honolulu in October
.

Chronicling America

The Pacific commercial advertiser. (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, July 16, 1905, Sunday Advertiser, Image 10
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The Hawaiian Star.
Honolulu, July 19, 1905, page 1.

PICTURES FOR THE PRESIDENT
MISS ALICE IN THE SURF BOAT AT WAIKIKI AND AT THE PALI.

Acting Governor Atkinson mailed a fine collection of pictures of Miss Alice Roosevelt to the President by the Alameda.
The President will therefore get the pictures before any of them are published, for it is expected that there will be lots of them published all over the country.

One of the best pictures is of the canoe containing Miss Roosevelt and party surf-riding at Walklki.
All of them are in bathing suits, of course.
Miss Roosevelt is at the front of the canoe, where as all who have tried surf-riding know, the spray Is almost drowning in its volume.
The others of the party are Mrs. Senator Dubois, Mrs. A. M. Brown, Congressman Longworth arid Acting Governor Atkinson.

Chronicling America
The Hawaiian star. (Honolulu [Oahu]) 1893-1912, July 19, 1905, SECOND EDITION, Image 1
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The Pacific Commercial Advertiser
Honolulu, July 20, 1905, page 9.

RAFT OF NEWS ABOUT TAFT PARTY
LOCAL BREVITIES.


Pictures of Miss Alice Roosevelt taken during her visit to the Pali and her canoeing rides at Waikiki beach were mailed yesterday to the President.
...
The pictures that were taken are to appear in Collier's, Harper's, Leslie's and a number of newspapers all over the country.

Chronicling America
The Pacific commercial advertiser. (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, July 20, 1905, Image 9

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI
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The Pacific Commercial Advertiser
Honolulu, July 23, 1905, Sunday Advertiser, page 10.

(Photograph)
MISS ALICE ROOSEVELT, AT THE PARAPET OF THE NUUANU PALI, LOOKING INTO THE KOOLAU REGION OF OAHU.
THIS IS ONE OF THE FINEST PICTURES OBTAINED OF MISS ROOSEVELT

Stuyvesant Fish Jr. one of the socially elect of New York and who is with the Taft party, will, on his return from the Philippines, go to work in the machine shops of the Illinois Central Railroad ...
Stuyvesant Fish, his father, is president of the Illinois Central Railroad.
Stuyvesant Fish is one of the leaders of New York and Newport society.
Young Fish has just been graduated from an Eastern college

In the Taft party, he, Roger K. Wetmore, son of Senator Wetmore of Rhode Island, and Congressman Nicholas Longworth of Cincinnati, are regarded as particular
admirers ot Miss Alice Roosevelt.


Chronicling America
The Pacific commercial advertiser. (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, July 23, 1905, Sunday Advertiser, Image 10
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The Pacific Commercial Advertiser.
Honolulu, August 28, 1905, page 1.

SUNDAY IN THE SURF AND ON SHORE
Beach Attractions Well Patronized by Large Throng of Visitors From Heated Honolulu.


Honolulu went Waikikiward yesterday in great shape.
In cars, automobiles and buggies, they made the tnp, and some on horses and bicycles.
The weather was fine, the surf was fine and it was a fine day all round.
It was one of those days when it is good to loll beneath the palms and read a book, but vastly better to be in the surf, and that the crowd figured it out that way the patronage afforded the various bathing resorts abundantly testified.
Car after car, loaded to the guards, ran to and from the beach all the afternoon, and automobiles raised the dust in right merry fashion along picturesque old Waikiki road, or Kalakaua avenue, as it is now supposed to be called.
The Royal Hawaiian Hotel Annex was signally favored by the bathers and the best part of a hundred people must have been in the water at one time, including a goodly representation of the fair sex.
The surf was running well and the best of sport among the breakers was enjoyed, both with surf-board and canoe.
Some very able exponents of the former pastime delighted the spectators on the beach, standing up, sitting down and occupying pretty well every conceivable position on the rapidly gliding boards.
Several canoe loads were out and surfed enthusiastically all the afternoon.
A feature of the scene was a tiny craft built along the lines of an Indian birch-bark canoe, which cruised to excellent advantage between the shore and the reef.
(Continued on Page 7.)

Chronicling America
The Pacific commercial advertiser. (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, August 28, 1905, Image 1
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The Hawaiian Gazette.
Honolulu, August 29, 1905, page 4.
 
The firm of Rice and Perkins, photographers, has been dissolved and the business will be carried on in future by Mr. Roscoe Perkins, who has been in sole charge for the past eight months.

Chronicling America
The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, August 29, 1905, Image 4
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The Pacific Commercial Advertiser
Honolulu, September 17, 1905, Sunday Advertiser, page 1.


REGATTA WON BY THE MYRTLES
Great Aquatic Festival of the Year Receives a Bumper Celebration.

...
Just after the senior race George Freeth gave an exhibition of fancy diving
from the Healani boat house.
The first was a "one and a half" somersault and dive off the trapeze.
The next was a back somersault from a 25-foot swing.
Then he made a back somersault from the 40-foot platform.
The next was a "cut-off,"one of the most difficult dives known.
A handstand finished an exhibition, such as is rarely seen, if ever, outside of Hawaii.

Chronicling America
The Pacific commercial advertiser. (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, September 17, 1905, Sunday Advertiser, Image 1
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The Pacific Commercial Advertiser
Honolulu, October 2, 1905, page 2.

IRON WORKS QUITS GAME
Unlooked for Ending of the Baseball Contest.

...
The game between the Makikis and the Diamond Heads was well contested and at the end of the seventh the Makikis led by 2 runs and looked like
winners.
The Diamond Heads piled up 3 runs in the eighth innings, however, and this decided the issue of the game.
George Freeth made a home run for the winners and Sumner and Crewes netted three-baggers.
The score ...
Diamond Heads- 10, Makikis- 8.

Chronicling America
The Pacific commercial advertiser. (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, October 02, 1905, Image 2
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Evening Star
Washington, D.C., October 17, 1905, page 13.


Gov. Carter Arouses Some Animosity.

...
Attempt to Establish Brick Manufacture.
Special Correspondent The Star.
HONOLULU. September 23.
...
Use of the Surf Boards.

The most impressive display of the native's adroitness in the sea is in his lithe performance upon the surf board, now seldom witnessed.
This is a thin board, from 12 to 15 inches wide and from 6 to 8 feet long and an inch or more In thickness, with sharpest edges and rounded ends.

With this under the arm the man or woman pushes off from the beach toward the heavy combing billows of the surf as it rolls in
He makes for the outer waves, diving adroitly with ilia board under each comber as It is about to strike him.
He selects a wave which is in the point of curling over and spreads himself at full length upon his board as the wave lifts under him.
At the same moment he strikes out actively with feet and hands to propel himself forward with the wave just fast enough to maintain a position exactly on the front of its combing summit.
Thus the wave lifts and pushes forward the board and rider at its own speed, the water spurting from the front of the board as It slides down the glossy surface, yet never falling lower, while the curling breaker envelops the feet in spray.
In another moment the rider rises upon hands and knees and, if skillful, stands erect upon his board, balancing It with his feet into the exact position neither to shoot forward of the breaker nor to be left behind it.
This performance has some resemblance to coasting upon an icy hillside, in the swift and skillful motion, as well as in the distance traversed from twenty to one hundred rods.
Only there is no drop downward.
Instead of gravity the push of the swift wave furnishing the impetus.
In the old days upon coasts like Kona, with Its swarming fishing villages, this surf play was the daily sport alike of the huge chieftains and the lean serfs, and hundreds of dark forms were to be seen dotting the white combers and rushing shorewards.
I write from childhood recollections of seventy years ago, when surf riding was no curiosity, although a person on horseback was such, and a wheeled vehicle never seen.

Chronicling America
Evening star. (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, October 17, 1905, Image 13
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Evening Bulletin.
Honolulu, November 9, 1905, page 6.

Norman Dole, the champion pole vaulter, has lost the second, third and little finger of his right hand at a mine in Tonopah, where he is engaged.

Chronicling America
Evening bulletin. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii) 1895-1912, November 09, 1905, 3:30 O'CLOCK EDITION, Image 6
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"Northern Pacific, Tacoma Division
Grays Harbor Line, Subdivision 16
...
Aloha
Aloha is between Stearnsville and Joe Creek Spur.
The town was named by Ralph D Emerson and Wilfred H Dole in 1905 for the Aloha Lumber Company.
The name, a Hawaiian greeting, was chosen by members of the Dole family, who also had heavy interests in Hawaii.
The town is located two miles east of Pacific Beach on Beaver Creek.  The town was serviced by the Northern Pacific Railroad Company.
The post office operated from October 16, 1906 to September 15, 1981.
The line between Aloha and Moclips was abandoned in 1978.
The line from Hoquiam and Aloha was abandoned in 1982.  Grays Harbor  (S22, T20N, R12W)  Tacoma Grays Harbor Line 16 WA Saint Clair."

- Northern Pacific, Tacoma Division
research.nprha.org/.../Grays%20Harbor%20Line.doc

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser
Honolulu, November 12, 1905, Sunday Advertiser, page 3.

Pete Barron, the swimming instructor at the Healani boat club headquarters, has resigned in order to take another posit ion.
George Freeth will continue his classes at the same hours as heretofore and will be pleased to meet all old pupils of Barron's and others desirous of learning to swim, at the boat house.
Freeth is in a class by himself as far as swimming and diving is concerned and besides possesses all the qualifications of a successful instructor.

Chronicling America
The Pacific commercial advertiser. (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, November 12, 1905, Sunday Advertiser, Image 3
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The Hawaiian Gazette.
Honolulu, December 5, 1905, page 1.

AN ANCIENT SLED FOUND IN A KONA BURIAL CAVE

Another historical and archeologlcal discovery has been made in a cave near Hookona, Kona, Hawaii.
This time a sled, with the ropes still attached, a surf board, a calabash and some other trinkets were found.
The finder is N. K. Pupul, a young Hawaiian resident of Honolulu, who recently visited Kona.
The cave was found In the face of a wall which rose sheer up close to the sea.
The entrance to the cave was very small and was barely discernible.

The sled, according to old-time natives, must be about three hundred years old.
They think It dates back 200 years before Kamehameha I's period.
The ropes are made of cocoa-nut fibers, and are still in fine condition.
The surf-board is very short, a style used by the natives for sport.

The Forbes discoveries from the Waipio gulch cave, have all been received at the Bishop Museum, and are being given a critical examination by those in charge.
These relics are believed by some to be the remains of Kamehameha I., but their identity is still being shrouded in mystery.

Chronicling America
The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, December 05, 1905, Image 1
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The Pacific Commercial Advertiser.
Honolulu, December 5, 1905, page 1.


AN ANCIENT SLED FOUND IN A KONA BURIAL CAVE

Another historical and archeological discovery has been made in a cave near Hookona, Kona, Hawaii.
This time a sled, with the ropes still attached, a deep-water surf board, a calabash and some other trinkets were found.
The finder is X. K. Pupui, a young Hawaiian resident of Honolulu, who recently visited Kona.
The cave was found in the face of a Pali which rose sheer up close to the sea.
The entrance to the cave was very small and was barely discernible.
The sled, according to old-time natives, must be about three hundred years old.
They think it dates back 200 years before Kamehameha I-'s period.
The ropes are made of cocoanut fibers, and are still in fine condition.
The surf-board is very short, a style used by the olden-time natives for deep-water sport.
The Forbes discoveries from the Waipio gulch cave, have all been received at the Bishop Museum, and are being given a critical examination by those in charge.
These relics are believed by some to be the remains of Kamehameha I., but their identity is still being shrouded in mystery.

Chronicling America
The Pacific commercial advertiser. (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, December 05, 1905, Image 1
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The Pacific Commercial Advertiser
Honolulu, December 6, 1905, page 5.


SLED OF A CHIEFTESS

On the 6th of last month, N. K. Pukui, traveling agent of the Hawaiian Realty and Maturity Co., while on a tour of the Island of Hawaii, found the
above illustrated sled in a cave at Hookena, Hawaii.

It is said that the oldest kamaainas of Hookena have heard from their parents and grandparents that sometime in the reign of King Keawenuiaumi, about two hundred and fifty or three hundred years ago, a high chiefess named Kaneamuna was then living at Hookena.

Her principal amusement was hee holua (coasting on a sled) and hee nalu (surfing).

She had her people make a sliding ground for her on a hill just back of the little village of Hookena, and ordered a sled, or land toboggan, called a papa holua, as well as a surfing board, or a papa hee
nalu.

When the slide was finished she passed many pleasant hours sliding down the steep hill.
This slide was composed of smooth stones covered with rushes.

After her death her sled and surf board disappeared, and the secret of their hiding-place was never revealed.
It is believed the sled and board found in the cave belonged to the High Chiefess.
They are made of the wood of the bread-fruit tree and at the present time are very good condition.
The cocoanut fiber ropes are still attached to the sled.


Photograph: ANCIENT HAWAIIAN SLED FOUND IN A KONA, HAWAII, CAVE.

[Below: ANCIENT HAWAIIAN SURFBOARD FOUND IN A KONA, HAWAII, CAVE]


The Pacific commercial advertiser. (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, December 06, 1905, Image 5
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The Pacific Commercial Advertiser
Honolulu, December 8, 1905, page 9.

SPORTS
...
George Freeth, the Maile quarterback, left for Kauai yesterday, to accept a position.

It looks as if a record-breaking crowd would witness tomorrow's game.

Chronicling America
The Pacific commercial advertiser. (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, December 08, 1905, Image 9
Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI
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1 March 1905 :
21 March 1905 :
16 June 1905 :
14 July 1905 :
14 July 1905 :
19 July 1905 :
5 December 1905 :
Surfboat Rescue, Manly.
Surfboard Rider Headstand, Waikiki.
Book Release, Honolulu.
County Board Seal, Oahu.
Alice Roosevelt, Waikiki.
Alice Roosevelt Photographs, Waikiki.
Ancient Sled and Surfboard Found, Kona.

January
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1904
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