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malvina hoffman:  speed and balance - bronze surfer, 1936 

Malvina Hoffman:  Speed and Balance - Bronze Surfer, 1936. 
Malvina Hoffman:  Speed and Balance (Bronze Surfer).
Field Museum News
Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago.
Volume 7 Number 11, November 1936.


Internet Archive

http://www.archive.org/details/fieldmuseumnews07fiel

Introduction
Field Museum of Natural History
Roosevelt Road and Lake Michigan, Chicago
Field Museum of Natural History Founded by Marshall Field, 1893.


Page 4
HAWAIIAN SURF-BOARD RIDER TYPIFIES POLYNESIAN RACE

Chief representative of the Polynesian race among the sculptures by Malvina Hoffman in Chauncey Keep Memorial Hall is a full length figure showing a young Hawaiian speeding toward the beach on his surf-board.
The race is also represented by two other bronzes, a head of a Hawaiian, and a bust of a Samoan (the latter pictured in the June, 1933 issue of Field Museum News).

Speed and Balance

A splendid example of Malvina Hoffman's skill in capturing motion is presented

by the sculpture of a Hawaiian riding his surf-board.
Individuals may obtain reproductions in bronze, either full or reduced size.
Those interested should communicate with the Director of the Museum.

Surf-board riding, while not as common as in former times, is still one of the favorite sports of the Hawaiians, as well as of many other islanders throughout the Pacific.
In the old days it was practised by all, from the lowest to the highest men, women, and children.
The most daring and skillful devotees favor the heaviest surf, and when huge rollers are coming in they sometimes swim out as much as half a mile with their boards, diving under each wave.
Choosing the largest swell, they balance themselves on their boards just behind the crest, and so are carried to shore. It takes great skill to keep the proper position to prevent sliding back or falling over in front.
The boards are carefully made of light wood, about one and a half inches thick, eighteen inches wide, and eight feet long, rounded at one end.

This is a splendid exercise for developing a good physique, and the Hawaiians are a well-built muscular people.
They are rather tall, the men averaging nearly five feet eight inches in height.
They are light brown in color, with dark or black hair varying from straight to wavy or even curly.
The head is rather broad, the forehead low but well- shaped with rather thick lips.
They are typical representatives of the Polynesian race which is scattered over the islands of the eastern Pacific from Hawaii to New Zealand.
The origin of the Polynesians is a problem still to be solved.
They are undoubtedly a mixed race that has reached its present location in a wave, or more likely several waves, of migration, probably from south-eastern Asia.
The movement, however, was doubtless gradual, with stopping places on the way.
In spite of a certain amount of variation, there is a general resemblance between the inhabitants of the different islands in language and culture, as well as in physical appearance.

Heads and Tales, the recently published book by Malvina Hoffman telling the story of her life and of the creation of the Races of Mankind sculptures, is on sale at the Museum.
It is a volume of 416 pages, profusely illustrated. Price $5, plus postage on mail orders.
Also available at the Museum are photogravure post cards of nearly all the racial sculptures, and, for those who desire them, larger photographs.
Under special arrangement, institutions or Photograph copyright Field Museum of Natural History 



Field Museum News
Field Museum of Natural History:
Roosevelt Road and Lake Michigan, Chicago
Volume 7 Number 11, November 1936.

Internet Archive

http://www.archive.org/details/fieldmuseumnews07fiel




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Geoff Cater (2017) : Malvina Hoffman:  Speed and Balance - Bronze Surfer, 1936.
http://www.surfresearch.com.au/1936_Field_Museum_Notes_Hoffman.html