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scientific american : balsa wood surfboard, 1919 

Scientific American : Balsa Wood Surfboard, 1919.
Balsa Wood Surfboard
Scientific American
Munn & Co , New York
Volume 121 Number 23, 
6 December 1919

Hathi Trust
https://hdl.handle.net/2027/mdp.39015024546395


Introduction

Page 559
New Uses for Balsa Wood

FOLLOWING its extensive application in airplane construction, balsa wood is now being used for other purposes with considerable commercial success.
Balsawood, it need hardly be mentioned here, is the lightest wood known - so light, in fact, that a child can readily carry a
beam as large as a railroad tie.
In the accompanying views are shown two interesting applications of balsa wood to surf sports.

The first shows the floating chair, which is nothing more than
 a horseshoe-shaped float provided with straps affording a comfortable seat.
The user can sit in comfort while floating about on the waves.

The second illustration depicts a fish-shaped surf-board
for coasting on the waves, also made of balsawood.

This surf-board is so light that it can be carried about by the little chap who is playing with it.

The floating chair and the surf-board - two novel applications of the lightest of woods, balsa.





Scientific American
Munn & Co , New York
Volume 121 Number 23, 
6 December 1919

Hathi Trust
https://hdl.handle.net/2027/mdp.39015024546395



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Geoff Cater (2017) : Scientific American : Balsawood Surfboard, 1919.
http://www.surfresearch.com.au/1919_12_Scientific_American_v121n23.html